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Surname:  Hall
Branch:  Hall
Origins:  Scottish
More Info:  Scotland

Background:  The first bearers of the distinguished surname Hall came to England in the great wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name is occupational in origin, stemming from the primary activity of the bearer. It is derived from the Old French term "halle," which referred to a large manor house, and indicates that the original bearer of the name worked at the manor of the local Lord in some role such as a servant or chamberlain. Many of the Norman noblemen who came to England with William the Conqueror soon grew dissatisfied with William's rule; as such, members of the Hall family accepted land grants from King Malcolm Canmore of Scotland, and became prominent in that country.




Motto:  Aut pax aut bellum, Either peace or war.
Arms:  az. a fesse, chequy or and gu. betw. three cranes' heads, erased, ar.


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The history of Scotland, shrouded by the mists of time, indicates that the name 'Hall', is a Norman surname. the name 'Hall', was found in Lincolnshire [England] where they were granted lands after the Norman Conquest in 1066. Upon entering England with the Norman Conquest, the Hall's were actually 'FITZ WILLIAM'S', they being settled in Greatford Hall in Lincolnshire, and being directly descended from Wentworth, Earl FitzWilliam. The younger son of this noble house, Arthur FitzWilliam, was called 'Hall', to distinguish him from his senior brother. Hence Arthur Hall would be the first on record about the year 1090 AD. The line continued in Lincolnshire, and intermarried with the Crispins, and the Earls of Chester. In Cheshire [England], the Hall's were a cadet branch of the Kingsley Hall's of that county. By 1340 AD, the name had moved northward at the invitation of Earl David of Huntingdon, later to become King David of Scotland. In Scotland, they were granted lands in Berwickshire, specifically the lands of Glenryg in the barony of Lesmahagow.

The first Hall of Fulbar in Renfrewshire was Thomas de Aula [Latin] for Hall], surgeon, who for his faithful service obtained from King Robert II a grant of land in the tenement of Staneley, barony of Renfrewshire, in 1370 AD [The register of the great seal of Scotland, volume I, pages 407, and 540]. The direct line of Hall of Fulbar ceased circa 1550 AD.

The Hall's were one of the sixty (60) major riding families of the Anglo-Scottish border and were involved in reiving as other border clans were. During one of the 'Day of Truce' occasions, a Robert Spragon 'fyled' a complaint against two Halls that had rustled 120 sheep. The traditional homes of the Hall's were at Redesdale in England; East Teviotdale, and Liddesdale, in Scotland. Some notables in the Scottish East March were: John Hall of Newbigging; George Hall (called Pats Geordie there; Andrew Hall of the Sykes, and Thom Hall in Fowlscheils. Other Hall's lived in Aynstrother; Glenryg, in the barony of Lesmahagow; Garvald; Irvide; Glasgow; Sancharmvr, in Preswick; and Perth.

The village of Otterburn, known for the famous battle and border ballad of the same name, contains an old Pele tower that was owned at one time by the Umfravilles. The property passed into the possession of the Hall family. A Hall by the name of 'Mad Jack Hall'' lived here and was also hung at Tyburn for his participation in the Rebellion .

The border ballad 'The Death of Parcy Reed' describes an incident that involved the 'fause hearted Hall's of Girsonfield'.

By 1600 AD, many branches had developed in England and Scotland: Lord Llanover, Sir John Hall, Bishop Hall of Bristol, Bishop Hall of Wearmouth, and at the same time, continuing their interest and seats at Skelton Castle, Yorkshire, Greatford Hall in Lincolnshire, and Gravell House in Middlesex. Notable amongst the family at this time was Hall of Berwickshire.

Name Variations:  Hall, Halle, Haule, Haul, Hal, De Aula, Hale, Haw, Collingwood, Crispin, Fitz William, MacHall.

References:
One or more of the following publications has been referenced for this article.
The General Armory; Sir Bernard Burke - 1842.
A Handbook of Mottoes; C.N. Elvin - 1860.
Scottish Clans and Tartans; Neil Grant - 2000.
Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia; George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire - 1994.
Scottish Clans and Tartans; Ian Grimble - 1973.
World Tartans; Iain Zaczek - 2001.
Clans and Families of Scotland; Alexander Fulton - 1991.

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